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FATCA Reporting – Foreign Assets | IRS FATCA Reporting

FATCA Reporting –  Foreign Assets | IRS FATCA Reporting (Golding & Golding)

FATCA Reporting – Foreign Assets | IRS FATCA Reporting (Golding & Golding)

FATCA Reporting – Foreign Assets | IRS FATCA Reporting

FATCA Reporting Under the current state of the law, FATCA has become a harsh reality for millions of people.

FATCA is the Foreign Account Tax Compliance Act, and it requires both individuals and foreign financial institutions worldwide to report foreign account and “Specified Asset” information to the IRS using U.S. Tax Form 8938 (for individuals)

FATCA Reporting

While the law has good intentions, it is abhorred by many — and for some, rightfully so.

Why? Because there are many individuals who reside overseas and have no other relation to the United States other than being born as a U.S. Citizen (Accidental American) or relocated from the United States to a foreign country many years ago — and then had no further interaction with the United States, who are now caught in the FATCA matrix.

FATCA Has come Under Scrutiny by Many

Worse yet, in order to enforce FATCA, many Foreign Financial Institutions are finding it easier to simply close and/or freeze U.S. Account Holder accounts, than to take the time to properly report any individuals who may be considered a U.S. person.

This is causing major disruptions for individuals residing overseas, and making it nearly impossible to exist as a foreign resident and U.S. Citizen/Legal Permanent Resident.

To that end, we will provide a brief summary of things you need to know regarding FATCA — hopefully to help relieve some of the stress, and bring you back to reality (after all those rabbit holes you dug through, and/or fear mongering websites you landed on).

Golding & Golding – We Specialize in IRS Offshore Disclosure

At Golding & Golding, we focus exclusively on IRS Offshore Voluntary Disclosure. 

Worldwide Income

The United States is one of only a handful of countries on the planet the taxes individuals on their worldwide income. What does that mean? It means that whether or not you reside in the United States or in a foreign country, you are required to report all of your US income as well as foreign source income on your U.S. Tax Return.

It also does not matter if the income you earn is tax exempt in a foreign country (PPF or Passive Income earned in many countries), or whether the income you earn in a foreign country was already taxed (although a Foreign Tax Credit or Foreign Earned Income Exclusion may apply, see below). While you may be able to obtain a credit or exemption for the taxes you paid, or income you earned in a foreign country – you are still required to report the income on your US tax return.

Moreover, it should be noted that the foreign passive income you earned is also required to be identified on the FATCA Form 8938 (thresholds vary based on their U.S. Residency Status and/or marital and filing status

You Must have An Interest in the Account for FATCA

Another similar form is called an FBAR (Report of Foreign Bank and Financial Account Form). It is a form that is required to be filed by any US person who has ownership, joint ownership, or signature authority over a foreign account or group of accounts that in aggregate had more than $10,000 on any day of the year.

With FATCA Form 8938 (required to be filed by certain taxpayers), the person must have an interest in the account. Therefore, if you merely have signature authority over an account, chances are you may not need to file the form. Moreover, if your name is on the account but you do not have any interest in the account — that is something you should discuss with an experienced international tax attorney before completing the form.

The Thresholds for filing vary

With the FBAR, the $10,000 threshold requirement does not vary. In other words, whether or not you are single, married filing jointly, or reside outside of the United States — the $10,000 threshold is still the same.

The FATCA Form 8938 is different. Not only must you have an interest in the account, but the threshold requirements vary — depending on whether you reside in the United States or in a foreign country, and whether you are married or single.

For example, if you are single or married filing separate and reside in the United States, then the minimum threshold requirement is $50,000 on the last day of the year or $75,000 on any day of the year (if you have less than $50,000 on the last day of the year). In sharp contrast a person filing married filing jointly and residing overseas may have a minimum threshold requirement of $400,000.

Specified Foreign Assets Apply

Unlike the FBAR, which is mainly focused on items such as accounts an insurance policies, FATCA Form 8938 is more comprehensive. It requires reporting for ownership of certain assets, such as an interest in a business or foreign corporation. The level of ownership of the foreign business, partnership, or corporation is important — because you don’t want to duplicate file the form 8938 and other forms (such as 8938 and 5471 or 8621).

Foreign Real Estate

If a person owns foreign real estate, whether or not they report the real estate will generally be determined by whether it earns any foreign income and/or whether the person is making interest or tax payments that they would like to deduct on their US tax return.

Foreign real estate is not directly reported on a FATCA Form 8938. If a person owns an interest in a foreign corporation or business that owns real estate, the ownership interest in the foreign business or corporation is subject to FATCA reporting — but the real estate is not separately identified on its own 8938.

You Have to Report the Income as well

A form 8938 has multiple parts to it, but the introductory part asks the taxpayer to identify whether the accounts or assets listed in the 8938 (or 8938 continuation form) generates any income. If it does, the individual is required to identify whether the income is capital gains, interest income, dividend income or any other type of income and how much was earned from those accounts.

(This information will also be included on other forms such as his or her Schedule B, Schedule D, Schedule E, or other tax schedule)

Form 3520

When a person receives a foreign gift or foreign trust distribution, they may be required to report it on a form 3520. A person has to report the receipt of a foreign gift if it exceeds $100,000 in either a single transaction or series of transactions. They have the report the receipt of a foreign gift from a corporation when it exceeds roughly $15,000, and they have to report any trust distribution.

If a is required to report the form 3520 they may not need to file a form 8938 for the same money.

Form 3520-A

When a person owns a Foreign Trust, they are required to file a form 3520-A. if a person is required to file a form 3520-A for particular foreign trust, they are not required to file a Form 8938 for the identical trust ownership.

Foreign Corporation or Foreign Partnership (5471 or 8865)

The rules are somewhat different for these two forms, but essentially the same (with the 5471 being much more commonplace for U.S. investors). If you own at least 10% ownership in either type of business, you required to report the information on either a form 5471 or 8865. Both of these forms require comprehensive disclosure requirements, involving balance statements, liabilities, assets, etc. Moreover, the forms need to be filed annually, even if a person does not have to otherwise file a tax return

Penalty: The penalty for failing to file each one of these information returns is $10,000, with an additional $10,000 added for each month the failure continues beginning 90 days after the taxpayer is notified of the delinquency, up to a maximum of $50,000 per return.

Golding & Golding Resources: Form 5471 Penalties

Passive Foreign Investment Company (PFIC)

One of the most vilified type of financial assets/investments (from the U.S. Government’s perspective) is the infamous PFIC. A PFIC is a Passive Foreign Investment Company. The reason the United States penalized this type of investment is because it cannot oversee the growth of the investment, and/or income it generates. In other words, if a U.S. person invests overseas in a Foreign Mutual Fund or Foreign Holding Company — the assets grows and generates income outside of IRS and U.S. Government income rules and regulations.

As a result, the IRS requires annual disclosure of anyone with even a fractional interest in a PFIC (unless you meet very strict exclusionary rules)

Penalty: The Penalties for not filing an 8621 run concurrent with the 8938 penalties (see above).

Golding & Golding Resources: Form 8621 Penalties; PFIC Form 8621 Excess Distribution Calculation

What Can You Do if You Are Not FATCA Compliant?

There are 5 main versions of the program. Here are the 5 Main Options:

(New) Updated Traditional IRS Voluntary Disclosure Program

When OVDP (Offshore Voluntary Disclosure Program) ended back in September 2018, the Internal Revenue Service was unclear as to whether a New “Offshore” Voluntary Disclosure Program would be introduced. Instead of a “new program,” the traditional voluntary disclosure program was expanded.

You can use the disclosure program to submit FBARs for your Foreign Bank Accounts, FATCA, PFIC, along with your Domestic Income

Resource: Summary of the Traditional IRS Voluntary Disclosure Program

Resource: Golding & Golding’s 8-Step Guide to See if you Qualify

SFCP – IRS Streamlined Filing Compliance Procedures

IRS Streamlined Filing Compliance Procedures are a stand-alone “streamlined” version of the traditional OVDP. The “stand-alone” streamlined filing procedures were created in 2014 by the Internal Revenue Service.

The purpose of the procedures are to assist taxpayers who were noncompliant with offshore reporting requirements – but were also non-willful.

If the Taxpayer can certify under penalty of perjury of being non-willful, the IRS reduces the penalty structure, and even waives the penalty for applicants who qualify as foreign residents.

Resource: Golding & Golding’s IRS Summary of IRS Streamlined Filing Compliance Procedures

SDOP – IRS Streamlined Domestic Offshore Procedures

SDOP is the Streamlined Domestic Offshore Procedures, and it is the program designed for for U.S. persons residing in the United States (or do not meet the technical “Foreign Resident Test”) 

Resource: Golding & Golding’s IRS Summary of IRS Streamlined Domestic Offshore Procedures

SFOP – IRS Streamlined Foreign Offshore Procedures

SFOP is the Streamlined Foreign Offshore Procedures. These are the Procedures for U.S. persons residing outside the United States is referred to as the Streamlined Foreign Offshore Procedures.

Resource: Golding & Golding’s IRS Summary of IRS Streamlined Foreign Offshore Procedures

DIRP – Delinquency Procedures for Offshore & Foreign Accounts and Assets

If you do not have any unreported income resulting in having to amend your tax returns — and all you have is unreported foreign assets, accounts or investments with no unreported income, you may be in luck. In these instances, in which you do not otherwise need to file for traditional offshore disclosure or the Streamlined Filing Compliance Procedures — you may qualify for the Delinquency Procedures and avoid any penalties.

Resource: Golding & Golding’s IRS Summary of Delinquent International Informational Return Submission Procedures

RC – Reasonable Cause for Offshore & Foreign Accounts and Assets

Reasonable Cause may be an option for some taxpayers. Specifically, if you were completely non-willful in your failure to disclosure, and were unaware that there was any reporting requirement, then the thought of paying any penalty may sound absurd.

Resource: Golding & Golding’s Summary of IRS Reasonable Cause for Offshore & Foreign Accounts & Assets

Fixing Lesser Experienced Law Firm mistakes.

IRS Voluntary Disclosure is complex enough for experienced practitioners who focus exclusively in the area of law, never mind relative newcomers who are trying to handle more than just offshore voluntary disclosure as part of their everyday tax practice.

We know, because those cases usually end up on our door-step. 

Resource: Examples of recent cases we had to takeover from less experienced Attorneys can be found by Clicking Here (Case 1) and Clicking Here (Case 2).

IRS Offshore “Potential” Penalty List

The following is a list of potential IRS penalties for unreported and undisclosed foreign accounts and assets:

Failure to File

If you do not file by the deadline, you might face a failure-to-file penalty. If you do not pay by the due date, you could face a failure-to-pay penalty. The failure-to-file penalty is generally more than the failure-to-pay penalty.

The penalty for filing late is usually 5 percent of the unpaid taxes for each month or part of a month that a return is late. This penalty will not exceed 25 percent of your unpaid taxes. If you file your return more than 60 days after the due date or extended due date, the minimum penalty is the smaller of $135 or 100 percent of the unpaid tax.

Failure to Pay

f you do not pay your taxes by the due date, you will generally have to pay a failure-to-pay penalty of ½ of 1 percent of your unpaid taxes for each month or part of a month after the due date that the taxes are not paid. This penalty can be as much as 25 percent of your unpaid taxes. If both the failure-to-file penalty and the failure-to-pay penalty apply in any month, the 5 percent failure-to-file penalty is reduced by the failure-to-pay penalty.

However, if you file your return more than 60 days after the due date or extended due date, the minimum penalty is the smaller of $135 or 100 percent of the unpaid tax. You will not have to pay a failure-to-file or failure-to-pay penalty if you can show that you failed to file or pay on time because of reasonable cause and not because of willful neglect.

Civil Tax Fraud

If any part of any underpayment of tax required to be shown on a return is due to fraud, there shall be added to the tax an amount equal to 75 percent of the portion of the underpayment which is attributable to fraud.

A Penalty for failing to file FBARs

The civil penalty for willfully failing to file an FBAR can be as high as the greater of $100,000 or 50 percent of the total balance of the foreign financial account per violation. See 31 U.S.C. § 5321(a)(5). Non-willful violations that the IRS determines were not due to reasonable cause are subject to a $10,000 penalty per violation.

A Penalty for failing to file Form 8938

The penalty for failing to file each one of these information returns is $10,000, with an additional $10,000 added for each month the failure continues beginning 90 days after the taxpayer is notified of the delinquency, up to a maximum of $50,000 per return.

A Penalty for failing to file Form 3520

The penalty for failing to file each one of these information returns, or for filing an incomplete return, is the greater of $10,000 or 35 percent of the gross reportable amount, except for returns reporting gifts, where the penalty is five percent of the gift per month, up to a maximum penalty of 25 percent of the gift.

A Penalty for failing to file Form 3520-A

The penalty for failing to file each one of these information returns or for filing an incomplete return, is the greater of $10,000 or 5 percent of the gross value of trust assets determined to be owned by the United States person.

A Penalty for failing to file Form 5471

The penalty for failing to file each one of these information returns is $10,000, with an additional $10,000 added for each month the failure continues beginning 90 days after the taxpayer is notified of the delinquency, up to a maximum of $50,000 per return.

A Penalty for failing to file Form 5472

The penalty for failing to file each one of these information returns, or to keep certain records regarding reportable transactions, is $10,000, with an additional $10,000 added for each month the failure continues beginning 90 days after the taxpayer is notified of the delinquency.

A Penalty for failing to file Form 926

The penalty for failing to file each one of these information returns is ten percent of the value of the property transferred, up to a maximum of $100,000 per return, with no limit if the failure to report the transfer was intentional.

A Penalty for failing to file Form 8865

Penalties include $10,000 for failure to file each return, with an additional $10,000 added for each month the failure continues beginning 90 days after the taxpayer is notified of the delinquency, up to a maximum of $50,000 per return, and ten percent of the value of any transferred property that is not reported, subject to a $100,000 limit.

Fraud penalties imposed under IRC §§ 6651(f) or 6663

Where an underpayment of tax, or a failure to file a tax return, is due to fraud, the taxpayer is liable for penalties that, although calculated differently, essentially amount to 75 percent of the unpaid tax.

A Penalty for failing to file a tax return imposed under IRC § 6651(a)(1)

Generally, taxpayers are required to file income tax returns. If a taxpayer fails to do so, a penalty of 5 percent of the balance due, plus an additional 5 percent for each month or fraction thereof during which the failure continues may be imposed. The penalty shall not exceed 25 percent.

A Penalty for failing to pay the amount of tax shown on the return under IRC § 6651(a)(2)

If a taxpayer fails to pay the amount of tax shown on the return, he or she may be liable for a penalty of .5 percent of the amount of tax shown on the return, plus an additional .5 percent for each additional month or fraction thereof that the amount remains unpaid, not exceeding 25 percent.

An Accuracy-Related Penalty on underpayments imposed under IRC § 6662

Depending upon which component of the accuracy-related penalty is applicable, a taxpayer may be liable for a 20 percent or 40 percent penalty

Possible Criminal Charges related to tax matters include tax evasion (IRC § 7201)

Filing a false return (IRC § 7206(1)) and failure to file an income tax return (IRC § 7203). Willfully failing to file an FBAR and willfully filing a false FBAR are both violations that are subject to criminal penalties under 31 U.S.C. § 5322.  Additional possible criminal charges include conspiracy to defraud the government with respect to claims (18 U.S.C. § 286) and conspiracy to commit offense or to defraud the United States (18 U.S.C. § 371).

A person convicted of tax evasion

Filing a false return subjects a person to a prison term of up to three years and a fine of up to $250,000. A person who fails to file a tax return is subject to a prison term of up to one year and a fine of up to $100,000. Failing to file an FBAR subjects a person to a prison term of up to ten years and criminal penalties of up to $500,000.  A person convicted of conspiracy to defraud the government with respect to claims is subject to a prison term of up to not more than 10 years or a fine of up to $250,000.  A person convicted of conspiracy to commit offense or to defraud the United States is subject to a prison term of not more than five years and a fine of up to $250,000.

How to Find Experienced & Reputable Offshore Voluntary Disclosure Counsel

Nearly all the experienced Attorneys in this field will have 5 Main Attributes:

  • Board Certified Tax Law Specialist
  • Master’s of Tax Law (aka LL.M.)
  • Dually Licensed as an Enrolled Agent or CPA
  • Around 20-Years of Private Practice experience
  • Extensive Litigation, Trial and related high-stakes experience.

Why is This Important? Because People Can be Whomever They Want to be Online

And that is the problem.

In recent years, we have had many clients come to us after being horribly represented by inexperienced tax counsel. While we are sure it is a problem in many fields, it seems to run rampant in IRS offshore voluntary disclosure.

These Attorneys ‘manipulate’ their past legal experiences, such as working for the IRS —  to make themselves sound more experienced than they are. You later find that they never worked as an attorney for the IRS, or even in the offshore disclosure department.  

The IRS has nearly 100,000 employees, and just being one of them does not make an attorney qualified to be an effective and experienced offshore voluntary disclosure tax attorney specialist.

IRS Offshore Disclosure is complex enough for experienced practitioners who focus exclusively in the area of law, never mind relative newcomers who are trying to handle more than just offshore voluntary disclosure as part of their everyday tax practice.

International Offshore Disclosure Lawyer Fees – How Much are They?

As in life, you get what you pay for.

To get the best representation possible, you need an experienced Board Certified Tax Law Specialist, with advanced degrees and advanced certifications.

If you want to hire a newer private-practice attorney that just opened shop a few years ago, hoping to save a little money on fees,  where they sold you on some “over-hyped” Kovel Letter – you’re putting yourself at risk.

Those cases usually end up on our doorstep down the line after the attorney made significant mistakes on the submission (sometimes costing the client significant amounts of time and fees that could have been avoided)

Golding & Golding – Board Certified in Tax Law

Golding & Golding represents clients worldwide in over 70-countries exclusively in Streamlined, Offshore and IRS Voluntary Disclosure matters. We have successfully completed more than 1000 streamlined and voluntary disclosure submissions.

Our Team Lead is a Board Certified Tax Law Specialist (Less than 1% of Attorneys nationwide) and Enrolled Agent, with a Master’s of Tax Law (LL.M.)

Mr. Golding leads his team in each and every case we accept for submission.

We are the “go-to” firm for other Attorneys, CPAs, Enrolled Agents, Accountants and Financial Professionals worldwide.


International Tax Lawyers - Golding & Golding, A PLC

International Tax Lawyers - Golding & Golding, A PLC

Golding & Golding: Our International Tax Lawyers practice exclusively in the area of IRS Offshore & Voluntary Disclosure. We represent clients in 70 different countries. Managing Partner, Sean M. Golding, JD, LL.M., EA and his team have represented thousands of clients in all aspects of IRS offshore disclosure and compliance during his 20-year career as an Attorney. Mr. Golding's articles have been referenced in such publications as the Washington Post, Forbes, Nolo and various Law Journals nationwide.

Sean holds a Master's in Tax Law from one of the top Tax LL.M. programs in the country at the University of Denver, and has also earned the prestigious Enrolled Agent credential. Mr. Golding is also a Board Certified Tax Law Specialist Attorney (A designation earned by Less than 1% of Attorneys nationwide.)
International Tax Lawyers - Golding & Golding, A PLC