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Eligible Deferred Compensation Items & U.S. Expatriation Tax Laws

Eligible Deferred Compensation Items & U.S. Expatriation Tax Laws - Golding & Golding

Eligible Deferred Compensation Items & U.S. Expatriation Tax Laws – Golding & Golding

Eligible Deferred Compensation Items & U.S. Expatriation Tax Laws

This is a common question we receive from clients re: Expatriation, so we wanted to try to explain it in plain (relatively plain) “English.” 

When it comes time to expatriation from the U.S. and the relinquishing/renouncement of your U.S. Citizenship or Green Card Status – you may still have a tax liability to uncle Sam.

Oftentimes, clients will come to us to prepare a hybrid expatriation/offshore disclosure submission, since it is impossible for covered expatriates to safely exit the U.S. Tax system if they are not in full compliance with IRS tax laws.

U.S. Expatriation

When it comes to the deemed sale rules and U.S. Expatriation, the IRS uses a mark-to-market model to determine your phantom or shadow income tax bill (deemed as if you sold everything on the day before you expatriated) — but there are some exceptions.

One main exception is “Eligible Deferred Compensation Item(s)”

*This is not the same as Specified Tax Deferred Accounts (which is also taxed differently). Noting, that while a simple IRA may be deferred compensation, most other IRAs are generally tax deferred.

**The difference is important, because Eligible Deferred Compensation Items are not taxed the same as Tax Deferred Accounts (which are deemed distributed).

Mark-to-Market

When a person expatriates from the U.S., most of the focus and concern is about any potential tax liability to the U.S.. when the person is deemed a “covered expatriate.”

For example, Jim a Legal Permanent Resident and (LTR) amassed a fortune when he came to the U.S.

Assuming there are no step-up issues for property acquired overseas, foreign pensions, etc. — when it is time to expatriate, Jim would calculate the value of each asset, determine the gain, apply the exclusion amount proportionate to the asset — and then net out the assets to arrive at the gain (or loss)

Deferred Compensation Items

“Deferred compensation” works differently. It is also important to distinguish between Eligible and Ineligible.

Eligible deferred compensation receives deferred treatment (explained below). Ineligible Deferred Compensation (such as most foreign pensions) are deemed distributed the day before expatriation.

With eligible deferred compensation, there is no immediate tax liability.

Sounds great, right….wrong.

The IRS is Still Going to Tax You…

…in the future.

At the time the now non-U.S. Person receives distributions from the fund, 30% will be withheld by the Payor AND, the person (who is now a non-U.S. Person) is no longer entitled (irrevocable election) to treaty benefits.

What is Eligible Deferred Compensation?

Eligible deferred compensation item means any deferred compensation item with respect to which:

– The payor is either a U.S. person or a non-U.S. person who elects to be treated as a U.S. person for purposes of section 877A(d)(1), and

– The covered expatriate notifies the payor of his or her status as a covered expatriate on Form W-8CE, and irrevocably waives any right to claim any withholding reduction on such item under any treaty with the United States on Form 8854.

– The Secretary may provide separate guidance providing a procedure for a payor who is a non-U.S. person and wishes to elect to be treated as a U.S. person for purposes of section

For  purposes of this subsection, the term “deferred compensation item” means—

(A) any interest in a plan or arrangement described in section 219(g)(5)

(B) any interest in a foreign pension plan or similar retirement arrangement or program

(C) any item of deferred compensation, and

(D) any property, or right to property, which the individual is entitled to receive in connection with the performance of services to the extent not previously taken into account under section 83 or in accordance with section 83.

Ineligible Deferred Compensation

Ineligible Deferred Compensation is usually foreign pensions, and results in an immediate tax liability (deemed distributed)

Are You Considering Expatriation and Offshore Disclosure?

Unlike other areas of International Tax, when it comes to Offshore Disclosure and Expatriation, you need a law firm that practices exclusively in the area of IRS Offshore Disclosure, and your attorney should be a Board Certified Tax Law Specialist.

We’re here to help you.

What is the Board Certified Tax Law Specialist Credential?

Once an Attorney earns the prestigious Board Certified Tax Law Specialist credential, it proves to the general public that the attorney is dedicated to tax law, and has real tax law practice experience as an Attorney.

Few tax attorneys have passed the tax speciality exam (regarded as one of the most difficult tax exams in the country) — and met the additional education, experience, and recommendation requirements necessary for certification.

Once a person becomes “Board Certified in Tax,” it shows they have met the following requirements:

  • Advanced tax education 
  • Extensive tax law experience
  • Attorney & Judge recommendations for certification

In California for example, there are 200,000 active Attorneys, with tens of thousands of Attorneys practicing in some area of tax — and only 350 Tax Attorneys have successfully earned the designation.

Less than 1% of Attorneys nationwide have earned the credential.

Sean M. Golding, JD, LL.M., EA (Board Certified Tax Law Specialist)

IRS Offshore Disclosure is ALL we do.

Our Managing Partner, Sean M. Golding, JD, LLM, EA  earned an LL.M. (Master’s in Tax Law) from the University of Denver and is also an Enrolled Agent (the highest credential awarded by the IRS, and authorizes him to represent clients nationwide.)

Mr. Golding and his team have successfully handled several hundred IRS Offshore/Voluntary Disclosure Procedure cases. Whether it is a simple or complex case, safely getting clients into compliance is our passion, and we take it very seriously.

He is frequently called upon to lecture and write on issues involving IRS Voluntary Disclosure.

Tax Law Specialty Firms are Best Prepared to Represent You in Specialized Tax Matters

Unless the firm has 50-100 attorneys, with a $25 million operating budget, a successful boutique tax-law firm will almost always have all of the attorneys in the firm devote the firms’s time, energy, and resources to one specific area of tax.

In other words, all the attorneys in the boutique tax firm practice the same, single area of tax law.

Some common niche areas of tax law include:

  • Tax Litigation
  • Employment Tax
  • Sales Tax
  • Offshore Voluntary Disclosure

For example, in employment tax, all tax attorneys in the firm handle employment tax related cases. In sales tax, all the tax attorneys in the firm handle sales tax. It may be “Sales Tax” in various different fields and industries — but the firm will limit the niche practice to sales tax.

The same is true for Offshore Voluntary Disclosure. If a firm handles Offshore Voluntary Disclosure, then all tax attorneys at the firm should be handling the same area of tax law.

This area of Offshore Disclosure law is constantly evolving, and becoming infinitely more complicated — including highly complex issues involving:

  • FBAR
  • FATCA
  • PFIC
  • CFC
  • International Cryptocurrency
  • J5
  • Increased Schedule B Enforcement (Paul Manafort)
  • Foreign Gifts
  • Foreign Inheritance
  • Foreign Business 
  • Foreign Trusts
  • OVDP
  • IRM
  • SDOP
  • SFOP

If a small firm has attorneys practicing 5-10 different areas of tax law (and even non-tax law related matters) – it can put your case at a severe disadvantage.

Why? Because it is impossible for these types of “general tax firms” to establish set protocols, policies and procedures sufficient to handle all the complexities and nuances for multiple different types of niche tax law areas.

At our tax specialty firm, we handle matters involving Offshore Voluntary Disclosure, and each case is led by one or more highly experienced attorneys.

This guarantees that your case gets the time and dedication it deserves.

Why Do We Care?

Because each month, like clockwork, we get calls from individuals in an utter state of panic, because the “Expert” or “Specialist” who made themselves out to be knowledgeable, has no real knowledge of Offshore Disclosure.

It turns out, the Attorney has never handled a complex Offshore Disclosure.

Oftentimes, Golding & Golding is called upon to fix these messes. Click Here to learn about some of the representative matters we have handled.

Serious Tax Matters; Serious Tax Consequences

Getting hit with an eggshell audit, reverse-eggshell audit, or IRS Special Investigation involving offshore money is serious business – it’s not like getting a traffic ticket or speeding ticket.

The ramifications of serious tax inquiries by the IRS (especially in the area of Offshore Disclosure and Compliance), can result in serious consequences such as monetary fines, penalties and even jail time.

Golding & Golding – IRS Offshore Disclosure Lawyers

We are the only attorneys worldwide that focuses exclusively in IRS Offshore Disclosure, and each and every case is led and managed by Mr. Golding and his team.

What Type of Attorney Should I Hire?

IRS Voluntary Disclosure is a specialized area of law. An IRS Voluntary Disclosure is a complex undertaking. It requires the coordination of several moving parts, including strategy development, Tax Preparation, Legal Analysis, Negotiation and more.

You should hire a Tax Attorney who has the following credentials:

  • ~20 Years of Private Practice experience representing his/her own clients
  • Experienced in Criminal and Civil Tax Litigation
  • Experienced representing clients in Eggshell and Reverse Eggshell Audits.
  • Advanced Tax Degree (LL.M.)
  • EA (Enrolled Agent) or CPA (Certified Public Accountant)
  • Preferably a Board Certified Tax Law Specialist

We Specialize in Safely Disclosing Foreign Money

We have successfully handled a diverse range of IRS Voluntary Disclosure and International Tax Investigation/Examination cases involving FBAR, FATCA, and high-stakes matters for clients around the globe (In over 65 countries!)

Whether it is a simple or complex case, safely getting clients into compliance is our passion, and we take it very seriously.

Examples of areas of tax we handle

Who Decides to Disclose Unreported Money?

What Types of Clients Do we Represent?

We represent Attorneys, CPAs, Doctors, Investors, Engineers, Business Owners, Entrepreneurs, Professors, Athletes, Actors, Entry-Level staff, Students, Former/Current IRS Agents and more.

You are not alone, and you are not the only one to find himself or herself in this situation.

Beware of Copycat Law Firms

Unlike other attorneys who call themselves specialists or experts in Voluntary Disclosure but are not “Board Certified,” handle 5-10 different areas of tax law, purchase multiple keyword specific domain names, and even practice outside of tax, we are absolutely dedicated to Offshore Voluntary Disclosure.

*Click here to learn the benefits of retaining a Board Certified Tax Law Specialist with advanced tax credentials.

IRS Penalty List

The following is a list of potential IRS penalties for unreported and undisclosed foreign accounts and assets:

Failure to File

If you do not file by the deadline, you might face a failure-to-file penalty. If you do not pay by the due date, you could face a failure-to-pay penalty. The failure-to-file penalty is generally more than the failure-to-pay penalty.

The penalty for filing late is usually 5 percent of the unpaid taxes for each month or part of a month that a return is late. This penalty will not exceed 25 percent of your unpaid taxes. If you file your return more than 60 days after the due date or extended due date, the minimum penalty is the smaller of $135 or 100 percent of the unpaid tax.

Failure to Pay

f you do not pay your taxes by the due date, you will generally have to pay a failure-to-pay penalty of ½ of 1 percent of your unpaid taxes for each month or part of a month after the due date that the taxes are not paid. This penalty can be as much as 25 percent of your unpaid taxes. If both the failure-to-file penalty and the failure-to-pay penalty apply in any month, the 5 percent failure-to-file penalty is reduced by the failure-to-pay penalty.

However, if you file your return more than 60 days after the due date or extended due date, the minimum penalty is the smaller of $135 or 100 percent of the unpaid tax. You will not have to pay a failure-to-file or failure-to-pay penalty if you can show that you failed to file or pay on time because of reasonable cause and not because of willful neglect.

Civil Tax Fraud

If any part of any underpayment of tax required to be shown on a return is due to fraud, there shall be added to the tax an amount equal to 75 percent of the portion of the underpayment which is attributable to fraud.

A Penalty for failing to file FBARs

The civil penalty for willfully failing to file an FBAR can be as high as the greater of $100,000 or 50 percent of the total balance of the foreign financial account per violation. See 31 U.S.C. § 5321(a)(5). Non-willful violations that the IRS determines were not due to reasonable cause are subject to a $10,000 penalty per violation.

A Penalty for failing to file Form 8938

The penalty for failing to file each one of these information returns is $10,000, with an additional $10,000 added for each month the failure continues beginning 90 days after the taxpayer is notified of the delinquency, up to a maximum of $50,000 per return.

A Penalty for failing to file Form 3520

The penalty for failing to file each one of these information returns, or for filing an incomplete return, is the greater of $10,000 or 35 percent of the gross reportable amount, except for returns reporting gifts, where the penalty is five percent of the gift per month, up to a maximum penalty of 25 percent of the gift.

A Penalty for failing to file Form 3520-A

The penalty for failing to file each one of these information returns or for filing an incomplete return, is the greater of $10,000 or 5 percent of the gross value of trust assets determined to be owned by the United States person.

A Penalty for failing to file Form 5471

The penalty for failing to file each one of these information returns is $10,000, with an additional $10,000 added for each month the failure continues beginning 90 days after the taxpayer is notified of the delinquency, up to a maximum of $50,000 per return.

A Penalty for failing to file Form 5472

The penalty for failing to file each one of these information returns, or to keep certain records regarding reportable transactions, is $10,000, with an additional $10,000 added for each month the failure continues beginning 90 days after the taxpayer is notified of the delinquency.

A Penalty for failing to file Form 926

The penalty for failing to file each one of these information returns is ten percent of the value of the property transferred, up to a maximum of $100,000 per return, with no limit if the failure to report the transfer was intentional.

A Penalty for failing to file Form 8865

Penalties include $10,000 for failure to file each return, with an additional $10,000 added for each month the failure continues beginning 90 days after the taxpayer is notified of the delinquency, up to a maximum of $50,000 per return, and ten percent of the value of any transferred property that is not reported, subject to a $100,000 limit.

Fraud penalties imposed under IRC §§ 6651(f) or 6663

Where an underpayment of tax, or a failure to file a tax return, is due to fraud, the taxpayer is liable for penalties that, although calculated differently, essentially amount to 75 percent of the unpaid tax.

A Penalty for failing to file a tax return imposed under IRC § 6651(a)(1)

Generally, taxpayers are required to file income tax returns. If a taxpayer fails to do so, a penalty of 5 percent of the balance due, plus an additional 5 percent for each month or fraction thereof during which the failure continues may be imposed. The penalty shall not exceed 25 percent.

A Penalty for failing to pay the amount of tax shown on the return under IRC § 6651(a)(2)

If a taxpayer fails to pay the amount of tax shown on the return, he or she may be liable for a penalty of .5 percent of the amount of tax shown on the return, plus an additional .5 percent for each additional month or fraction thereof that the amount remains unpaid, not exceeding 25 percent.

An Accuracy-Related Penalty on underpayments imposed under IRC § 6662

Depending upon which component of the accuracy-related penalty is applicable, a taxpayer may be liable for a 20 percent or 40 percent penalty

Possible Criminal Charges related to tax matters include tax evasion (IRC § 7201)

Filing a false return (IRC § 7206(1)) and failure to file an income tax return (IRC § 7203). Willfully failing to file an FBAR and willfully filing a false FBAR are both violations that are subject to criminal penalties under 31 U.S.C. § 5322.  Additional possible criminal charges include conspiracy to defraud the government with respect to claims (18 U.S.C. § 286) and conspiracy to commit offense or to defraud the United States (18 U.S.C. § 371).

A person convicted of tax evasion

Filing a false return subjects a person to a prison term of up to three years and a fine of up to $250,000. A person who fails to file a tax return is subject to a prison term of up to one year and a fine of up to $100,000. Failing to file an FBAR subjects a person to a prison term of up to ten years and criminal penalties of up to $500,000.  A person convicted of conspiracy to defraud the government with respect to claims is subject to a prison term of up to not more than 10 years or a fine of up to $250,000.  A person convicted of conspiracy to commit offense or to defraud the United States is subject to a prison term of not more than five years and a fine of up to $250,000.

What Should You Do?

Everyone makes mistakes. If at some point that you should have been reporting your foreign income, accounts, assets or investments the prudent and least costly (but most effective) method for getting compliance is through one of the approved IRS offshore voluntary disclosure program.

Be Careful of the IRS

With the introduction and enforcement of FATCA for both Civil and Criminal Penalties, renewed interest in the IRS issuing FBAR Penalties, crackdown on Cryptocurrency (and IRS joining J5), the termination of OVDP, and recent foreign bank settlements with the IRS…there are not many places left to hide.

4 Types of IRS Voluntary Disclosure Programs

There are typically four types of IRS Voluntary Disclosure programs, and they include:

Contact Us Today; Let us Help You.